Thursday, 26 October 2017

Louis Armstrong - St. Louis Blues

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  • Published on Tuesday, 26 November 2013 15:21
  • Written by Super User
  • Hits: 750

Black And Blue - 4.02
I'm Confessin That I Love You - 4.12
Struttin With Some Barbeque - 1.46
Up A Lazy River - 3.25
Save It Pretty Mama - 2.56
Ain't Misbehavin - 2.55
St. Louis Blues - 3.11
Rockin Chair - 4.39
Tiger Rag - 4.39
Dippermouth Blues - 4.29
Mahogany Hall Stomp - 2.50
Muskrat Ramble - 2.22

Louis Armstrong emerged from an impoverished background to become one of the most acclaimed worldwide entertainers of his day, in addition to being one of the first major jazz soloists. Born in New Orleans in 1901, Armstrong’s first music lessons came after he was sent to the Colored Waifs Home for discharging a gun. Exposure to local jazzmen like King Oliver, Kid Ory, Sidney Bechet and others drew him into playing jazz for a living, though he would come to eclipse all of his early influences. Leaving his hometown to work with Oliver in Chicago, Armstrong would become a leader himself within a few short years and grew into a beloved performer whose music transcended stylistic boundaries. He toured and recorded often, especially as an Ambassador representing the U.S. State Department as he played around the world. Though plagued with various ailments during the last decade of his life, Armstrong continued to play concerts and record until his death from a heart attack on July 6, 1971.

Armstrong is heard with Edmond Hall’s sextet from a 1947 Carnegie Hall concert that featured the trumpeter with the clarinetist’s group and later with his own orchestra. Most of the songs had become a part of Armstrong’s concert repertoire and he would play they countless times for the remainder of his life.

Armstrong shines on trumpet and adds an engaging vocal in Fats Waller’s “Black and Blue,” with a brief solo by Hall as well. “I’m Confessin’” is all Armstrong, with the leader offering a heartfelt vocal and inspired trumpet solo. The lively interplay within “Struttin’ With Some BarbeLouis Armstrong emerged from an impoverished background to become one of the most acclaimed worldwide entertainers of his day, in addition to being one of the first major jazz soloists. Born in New Orleans in 1901, Armstrong’s first music lessons came after he was sent to the Colored Waifs Home for discharging a gun. Exposure to local jazzmen like King Oliver, Kid Ory, Sidney Bechet and others drew him into playing jazz for a living, though he would come to eclipse all of his early influences. Leaving his hometown to work with Oliver in Chicago, Armstrong would become a leader himself within a few short years and grew into a beloved performer whose music transcended stylistic boundaries. He toured and recorded often, especially as an Ambassador representing the U.S. State Department as he played around the world. Though plagued with various ailments during the last decade of his life, Armstrong continued to play concerts and record until his death from a heart attack on July 6, 1971

Armstrong is heard with Edmond Hall’s sextet from a 1947 Carnegie Hall concert that featured the trumpeter with the clarinetist’s group and later with his own orchestra. Most of the songs had become a part of Armstrong’s concert repertoire and he would play they countless times for the remainder of his life.

Armstrong shines on trumpet and adds an engaging vocal in Fats Waller’s “Black and Blue,” with a brief solo by Hall as well. “I’m Confessin’” is all Armstrong, with the leader offering a heartfelt vocal and inspired trumpet solo. The lively interplay within “Struttin’ With Some Barbecue” (credited to his ex-wife Lil but often attributed to Louis) recalls the leader’s New Orleans roots. While Armstrong’s playful scatting is the centerpiece of Hoagy Carmichael’s “Up a Lazy River,” the raucous interpretation of Fats Waller’s “Ain’t Misbehavin’” is the best showcase for the band, with Armstrong featuring Hall and trombonist Henderson Chambers as well. W. C. Handy’s timeless “St. Louis Blues” is an equally spirited performance, blending elements of New Orleans Jazz and swing with a tinge of Latin. The trumpeter pays homage to his former boss King Oliver with “Dippermouth Blues,” sharing the spotlight with Hall. Bassist Johnny Williams’ vocal backing in “Rockin’ Chair” is fairly subdued compared to the way Armstrong interacted with Jack Teagarden, providing a softly spoken refrain to the trumpeter’s lead vocal. All in all, this septet foreshadows the creation of Louis Armstrong’s All-Stars a few years later.cue” (credited to his ex-wife Lil but often attributed to Louis) recalls the leader’s New Orleans roots. While Armstrong’s playful scatting is the centerpiece of Hoagy Carmichael’s “Up a Lazy River,” the raucous interpretation of Fats Waller’s “Ain’t Misbehavin’” is the best showcase for the band, with Armstrong featuring Hall and trombonist Henderson Chambers as well. W. C. Handy’s timeless “St. Louis Blues” is an equally spirited performance, blending elements of New Orleans Jazz and swing with a tinge of Latin. The trumpeter pays homage to his former boss King Oliver with “Dippermouth Blues,” sharing the spotlight with Hall. Bassist Johnny Williams’ vocal backing in “Rockin’ Chair” is fairly subdued compared to the way Armstrong interacted with Jack Teagarden, providing a softly spoken refrain to the trumpeter’s lead vocal. All in all, this septet foreshadows the creation of Louis Armstrong’s All-Stars a few years later.

 

 
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