Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Lloyd Glenn - After Hours

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  • Published on Friday, 29 November 2013 11:47
  • Written by Super User
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Lloyd Glenn - After Hours

Jungle Twilight - 2:43
Daybreak Stomp -
2:29
Cute Tee -
2:36
Congo Rhumba - 3:05
Yancey Special - 2:54
After Hours -
2:52
Honky Tonk Train Blues - 2:54
Pinetop's Boogie Woogie -
2:23
Ugh - 1:44
Boogie On St. Louis -
2:47
It Moves Me -
2:45
Night Time -
3:07

Lloyd Glenn - After Hours

A native of San Antonio, pianist Lloyd Glenn left his mark on the blues scene in Southern California. He moved to Los Angeles in 1942 and played regularly as a sideman, joining T-Bone Walker on the guitarist’s hit “Stormy Monday” and a number of sessions by guitarist Lowell Fulson. In 1947, Glenn launched his group The Joymakers, recording a number of popular records for several labels over the next decade. By the 1960s, Glenn was recording on an irregular basis, yet the pianist still found club work and occasionally backed singer Big Joe Turner. He also revisited

some of his earlier hits for a European label in 1974. Lloyd Glenn died in 1985 in Los Angeles.

The tracks by Lloyd Glenn & His Joymakers were recorded over several sessions between 1950 and 1951, featuring bassist Billy Hadnott, drummer Bob Harvey (who mostly plays with brushes) and on some selections, bongo player Earl Burton. Several of the songs were written by other pianists, including Pine Top Smith’s “Pine Top’s Boogie Woogie,” featuring Glenn’s potent bass line and his imaginative improvising. He has a lighter touch than Meade Lux Lewis in his approach to Lewis’ “Honky Tonk Train Blues,” opting not to pound the bass line as hard or speed up the tempo too much as Lewis frequently did in later years. Glenn also delivers an exuberant take of Lewis’ “Yancey Special” (a tribute to boogie woogie pioneer Jimmy Yancey). Earl Hines was the first pianist to perform and record a boogie-woogie treatment of W. C. Handy’s “St. Louis Blues,” though Glenn’s version is a bit more laid back, even as it uses the tremolo popularized by Hines (though far briefer) in his recording. The use of bongos may have been in pired in part by Nat King Cole’s addition of Jack Costanzo in 1949. “Cute Tee” blends blues, boogie-woogie and a Latin air, with its staggered rhythm, while Glenn’s humming is amplified with the use of reverb in the deliberate blues “Conga Rhumba.” “Ugh” is a miniature that adds a gritty tenor sax, likely Marshall Davis. A guitarist is also present, likely Herman Mitchell, for the sextet’s loping, infectious blues “It Moves Me.” Mitchell, Davis and Glenn share the solo spotlight in the pianist’s loping “Night Time.”

 

 

 
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