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Dave Camp - Night Fall

Your Eyes - 5.04
Nightfall - 4.45
Spy Vs Spy - 4.35
Feelin' Good - 4.04
Love Garage - 4.10
Losing You - 4.34
The Farther Star - 3.54
Dave'S House - 4.07
Redemption - 5.38
Party Of Two - 4.26


In Torrid Rain, his hit debut, saxophonist Dave Camp came out cooking. Now he’s back with Night Fall, a new CD that finds him in a mellower mood—more laid-back, perhaps, but definitely not catatonic. This is still Dave Camp, and he still likes his music to swing. Night Fall is Camp’s baby from beginning to end, he produced it, wrote or co-wrote all the tunes and plays tenor, flute or alto lead on every cut. As on Torrid Rain, he’s joined by longtime friends and collaborators Peter White (guitar), John Mahon (drums) and John Menzano (bass). Also along for the ride this time is trumpeter Roy Wiegand, who took time out from a Pink Floyd tour for the recording date. Together, these fine musicians have given us an our or so of contemporary jazz at its best. But then, Camp has been doing that for years. A native of Monterey, Calif., he first picked up the flute at the tender age of 8. The sax followed three years later, and by his teens, Camp was a fixture in the Monterey Jazz Festival All-Star High School Jazz Band. During these early years, the young prodigy absorbed the artistry of Grover Washington, Jr., Michael Brecker and David Sanborn—his major influences—and even landed tour dates with Chuck Mangione and Doc Severinsen. After two years at San Francisco State, Camp enrolled at the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston, where he majored in saxophone performance—an experience he describes as “learning as fast and as hard as you can with as much competition as you can possibly stand for as long as you can stand it.” He must have stood it pretty well, for he earned his degree—and a concert stint with the great Buddy Rich. Camp then toured Japan with his own band—playing to packed houses for three weeks—before returning to California, where he’s been based ever since. For the past decade, Camp has toured and recorded regularly with Al Stewart and White. He’s also written music for television and music libraries and even acted in TV commercials. And he’s done frequent gigs with Windows, the popular contemporary jazz group whose releases on Blue Orchid are regular residents on the NAC charts. (Camp’s work with Windows can be heard on From the Asylum and Apples and Oranges, which also features Peter White.) The long Camp-White collaboration is very much alive on Night Fall. The two friends are responsible for the nifty flute-guitar duet in “Your Eyes,” a romantic ballad over a gentle Latin beat. Camp stays with the flute for “Feelin’ Good” and for the moody “Party of Two,” which was co-written by Mahon, another Windows alumnus. Camp switches to alto for the beautiful “The Farther Star.” Everywhere else, Camp is on tenor—and swinging most of the time, from the sly, aggressive humor of “Spy vs. Spy” to the straight-ahead drive of “Redemption”—”a four-on-the-floor” dance track,” according to its creator. # # # In Torrid Rain, his hit debut, saxophonist Dave Camp came out cooking. Now he’s back with Night Fall, a new CD that finds him in a mellower mood—more laid-back, perhaps, but definitely not catatonic. This is still Dave Camp, and he still likes his music to swing. Night Fall is Camp’s baby from beginning to end, he produced it, wrote or co-wrote all the tunes and plays tenor, flute or alto lead on every cut. As on Torrid Rain, he’s joined by longtime friends and collaborators Peter White (guitar), John Mahon (drums) and John Menzano (bass). Also along for the ride this time is trumpeter Roy Wiegand, who took time out from a Pink Floyd tour for the recording date. Together, these fine musicians have given us an our or so of contemporary jazz at its best. But then, Camp has been doing that for years. A native of Monterey, Calif., he first picked up the flute at the tender age of 8. The sax followed three years later, and by his teens, Camp was a fixture in the Monterey Jazz Festival All-Star High School Jazz Band. During these early years, the young prodigy absorbed the artistry of Grover Washington, Jr., Michael Brecker and David Sanborn—his major influences—and even landed tour dates with Chuck Mangione and Doc Severinsen. After two years at San Francisco State, Camp enrolled at the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston, where he majored in saxophone performance—an experience he describes as “learning as fast and as hard as you can with as much competition as you can possibly stand for as long as you can stand it.” He must have stood it pretty well, for he earned his degree—and a concert stint with the great Buddy Rich. Camp then toured Japan with his own band—playing to packed houses for three weeks—before returning to California, where he’s been based ever since. For the past decade, Camp has toured and recorded regularly with Al Stewart and White. He’s also written music for television and music libraries and even acted in TV commercials. And he’s done frequent gigs with Windows, the popular contemporary jazz group whose releases on Blue Orchid are regular residents on the NAC charts. (Camp’s work with Windows can be heard on From the Asylum and Apples and Oranges, which also features Peter White.) The long Camp-White collaboration is very much alive on Night Fall. The two friends are responsible for the nifty flute-guitar duet in “Your Eyes,” a romantic ballad over a gentle Latin beat. Camp stays with the flute for “Feelin’ Good” and for the moody “Party of Two,” which was co-written by Mahon, another Windows alumnus. Camp switches to alto for the beautiful “The Farther Star.” Everywhere else, Camp is on tenor—and swinging most of the time, from the sly, aggressive humor of “Spy vs. Spy” to the straight-ahead drive of “Redemption”—”a four-on-the-floor” dance track,” according to its creator. # # #

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