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Various Artists : Swing Summit Vol 1

Cottontail - 11.53
In A Mellowtone - 14.31
The Summer Knows - 5.18
Blue Moon - 7.44
Things Ain'T What They Used To Be - 12.45
Namesake - 10.14
Basie Like - 13.24
Upper Manhattan Medical Group - 11.03
You'Ve Changed - 5.33
Body & Soul, C Jam Blues - 6.35
C Jam Blues - 11.09
Take The A Train - 9.25


SWING SUMMIT — FIVE MODERN MASTERS LIVE IN CONCERT SEA BRIGHT, NJ, April, 1999 —If Kenny Barron is there, it’s an event. If Jon Faddis is there, it’s also an event. If both are present—along with Frank Wess, Ben Riley, Ray Drummond and Steve Turre—it’s definitely a summit meeting. And so it was in June 1997, when those six outstanding musicians gathered to celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Tarrytown Music Hall jazz series, the special brainchild of producer/ trumpeter Mark Morganelli. The original Swing Summit had featured Wess, Billy Taylor, Milt Hinton, Oliver Jackson, Harry “Sweets” Edison and Al Gray, all of them jazz veterans with roots in the Swing era. The anniversary concert united Wess with a younger generation (or two), hence its subtitle: “Passing the Torch.” But if the lineup had changed, the spirit was definitely present that June. Pianist Barron is a perennial poll winner and one of the masters of modern jazz. His big-band credentials date back to the 1960s, when he played with Dizzy Gillespie’s aggregation. Trumpeter Faddis likewise has strong connections to Dizzy, having been the master’s protege for many years. Today, Faddis leads the Carnegie Hall Jazz Band and carries on the Gillespie tradition of high-altitude pyrotechnics on his instrument. Saxophonist/flutist Wess is a veteran of the Count Basie and Toshiko Akiyoshi bands. Bassist Drummond, a longtime collaborator with Barron, cut his musical teeth with the Charles Mingus big band. Drummer Ben Riley, another Barron associate, boasts a pedigree that dates back to the late Swing era and includes a stint with Thelonious Monk. The wild card in the deck is undoubtedly trombonist Steve Turre. Called to fill in for the ailing Al Grey, Turre is a relative whippersnapper whose regular gig at the time of the Tarrytown concert was the band on “Saturday Night Live.” But never fear, Turre is a respected, accomplished jazz musician—and a poll winner in his own right (on conch shells, which he plays with astonishing artistry). Together—and they played together wonderfully—these six very individual musicians tackled a gaggle of standards: “Blue Moon,” “Body and Soul,” “Cottontail,” In a Mellow Tone,” “Take the A Train.” The also served up Milt Jackson’s “Namesake” and Morganelli’s “Basie-Like,” a 1980s composition that harks back to the riff-driven Basie band of the 1930s. Like that venerable organization, they made everything swing. John Nielsen ### FEATURING Ben Riley (drums) Ray Drummond (bass) Jon Faddis (trumpet) Frank Wess (tenor saxophone, flute) Steve Turre (trombone, conch shells) Kenny Barron (piano) SONGS Vol. 1 (SJ- 6002-2) Cottontail (11:53) In A Mellowtone (14:31) The Summer knows (5:18) Blue Moon (7:44) Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (12:45) Namesake (10:14) Vol. 2 (SJ- 6003-2) Basie Like (13:24) Upper Manhattan Medical Group (11:03) You’ve Changed (5:33) Body & Soul, C Jam Blues (6:35) Take The A Train (9:25) SWING SUMMIT — FIVE MODERN MASTERS LIVE IN CONCERT SEA BRIGHT, NJ, April, 1999 —If Kenny Barron is there, it’s an event. If Jon Faddis is there, it’s also an event. If both are present—along with Frank Wess, Ben Riley, Ray Drummond and Steve Turre—it’s definitely a summit meeting. And so it was in June 1997, when those six outstanding musicians gathered to celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Tarrytown Music Hall jazz series, the special brainchild of producer/ trumpeter Mark Morganelli. The original Swing Summit had featured Wess, Billy Taylor, Milt Hinton, Oliver Jackson, Harry “Sweets” Edison and Al Gray, all of them jazz veterans with roots in the Swing era. The anniversary concert united Wess with a younger generation (or two), hence its subtitle: “Passing the Torch.” But if the lineup had changed, the spirit was definitely present that June. Pianist Barron is a perennial poll winner and one of the masters of modern jazz. His big-band credentials date back to the 1960s, when he played with Dizzy Gillespie’s aggregation. Trumpeter Faddis likewise has strong connections to Dizzy, having been the master’s protege for many years. Today, Faddis leads the Carnegie Hall Jazz Band and carries on the Gillespie tradition of high-altitude pyrotechnics on his instrument. Saxophonist/flutist Wess is a veteran of the Count Basie and Toshiko Akiyoshi bands. Bassist Drummond, a longtime collaborator with Barron, cut his musical teeth with the Charles Mingus big band. Drummer Ben Riley, another Barron associate, boasts a pedigree that dates back to the late Swing era and includes a stint with Thelonious Monk. The wild card in the deck is undoubtedly trombonist Steve Turre. Called to fill in for the ailing Al Grey, Turre is a relative whippersnapper whose regular gig at the time of the Tarrytown concert was the band on “Saturday Night Live.” But never fear, Turre is a respected, accomplished jazz musician—and a poll winner in his own right (on conch shells, which he plays with astonishing artistry). Together—and they played together wonderfully—these six very individual musicians tackled a gaggle of standards: “Blue Moon,” “Body and Soul,” “Cottontail,” In a Mellow Tone,” “Take the A Train.” The also served up Milt Jackson’s “Namesake” and Morganelli’s “Basie-Like,” a 1980s composition that harks back to the riff-driven Basie band of the 1930s. Like that venerable organization, they made everything swing. John Nielsen ### FEATURING Ben Riley (drums) Ray Drummond (bass) Jon Faddis (trumpet) Frank Wess (tenor saxophone, flute) Steve Turre (trombone, conch shells) Kenny Barron (piano) SONGS Vol. 1 (SJ- 6002-2) Cottontail (11:53) In A Mellowtone (14:31) The Summer knows (5:18) Blue Moon (7:44) Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (12:45) Namesake (10:14) Vol. 2 (SJ- 6003-2) Basie Like (13:24) Upper Manhattan Medical Group (11:03) You’ve Changed (5:33) Body & Soul, C Jam Blues (6:35) Take The A Train (9:25)

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