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UPC - 031397400128
Greg Abate - Bop Lives

Release Date - Jul, 1996
$14.98

Love'S No Secret - 7.38
Happenin' - 5.37
Blues For H.O. - 4.02
This I Dig Of You - 7.21
Bop Lives! - 6.36
Ask Me Now - 9.36
Voyage - 5.15
Children'S Waltz - 6.46
Speak Low - 10.52

It was a musical style that developed more than half a century ago, during the waning years of the Golden Age of big bands. Its pioneers included people who are now looked upon as masters of their craft, folks like Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk. Their creation is so enduring that today it still serves as the foundation for a lot of what is called modern jazz. That’s what makes the title of this album so obvious. Bop Lives ? Hell. yes! Sure, the drummers don’t constantly “drop bombs” behind the soloists, and the tunes aren’t all based on the chord changes on existing music, but that’s just tribute to the music’s ability to progress. Greg Abate, the talented multi-reed player from New England, has demonstrated his versatility on several horns on previous albums, but for this outing decided to stick strictly with the alto, his sound having no small similarity to boppers Parker and Sonny Stitt. Abate is joined here by a dream rhythm section – a virtual who’s who of the jazz world – Claudio Roditi on trumpet and flugelhorn, Kenny Baron on piano, Rufus Reid on bass and Ben Reily on drums. Abate’s style is modern, picking up aspects of both bebop and angular modal playing. “It’s not trying to copy any bebop pioneer. I respect those pioneers like Parker and Gillespie. Now, bebop is more a style of playing. I could be playing on a ballad and play a bebop solo, even though the tune isn’t necessarily a bebop tune. I think you can arrange a tune these days where certain sections can be bebop and others different styles, like Latin or modal.” The material on this album, some originals by the band members and producer, some jazz standards, was chosen very carefully. “Every recording is very special to me,” he said. For example, “Children’s Waltz” owes its title to the fact that Abate has three of his own. The tune also allows Abate to feature pianist Kenny Barron extensively. Barron is also featured on his own tune, “Voyage,” which Abate had already recorded for an earlier album but did not use. He wanted to redo it , focusing on the arrangement a little differently, having trumpeter Claudio Roditi as his partner on it. “I called this album Bop Lives!. That’s the way I feel about my playing. I like to keep that spirit alive. It’s been really enjoyable for me to be able to learn and play this music. I think it will be around for a long time.” It was a musical style that developed more than half a century ago, during the waning years of the Golden Age of big bands. Its pioneers included people who are now looked upon as masters of their craft, folks like Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk. Their creation is so enduring that today it still serves as the foundation for a lot of what is called modern jazz. That’s what makes the title of this album so obvious. Bop Lives ? Hell. yes! Sure, the drummers don’t constantly “drop bombs” behind the soloists, and the tunes aren’t all based on the chord changes on existing music, but that’s just tribute to the music’s ability to progress. Greg Abate, the talented multi-reed player from New England, has demonstrated his versatility on several horns on previous albums, but for this outing decided to stick strictly with the alto, his sound having no small similarity to boppers Parker and Sonny Stitt. Abate is joined here by a dream rhythm section – a virtual who’s who of the jazz world – Claudio Roditi on trumpet and flugelhorn, Kenny Baron on piano, Rufus Reid on bass and Ben Reily on drums. Abate’s style is modern, picking up aspects of both bebop and angular modal playing. “It’s not trying to copy any bebop pioneer. I respect those pioneers like Parker and Gillespie. Now, bebop is more a style of playing. I could be playing on a ballad and play a bebop solo, even though the tune isn’t necessarily a bebop tune. I think you can arrange a tune these days where certain sections can be bebop and others different styles, like Latin or modal.” The material on this album, some originals by the band members and producer, some jazz standards, was chosen very carefully. “Every recording is very special to me,” he said. For example, “Children’s Waltz” owes its title to the fact that Abate has three of his own. The tune also allows Abate to feature pianist Kenny Barron extensively. Barron is also featured on his own tune, “Voyage,” which Abate had already recorded for an earlier album but did not use. He wanted to redo it , focusing on the arrangement a little differently, having trumpeter Claudio Roditi as his partner on it. “I called this album Bop Lives!. That’s the way I feel about my playing. I like to keep that spirit alive. It’s been really enjoyable for me to be able to learn and play this music. I think it will be around for a long time.”


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