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UPC - 031397202425
Denny Jiosa - Jazzberry Pie

Release Date - Feb, 1998
$14.98

Old Money - 4.39
57 Pearl Street - 4.07
Vertigo - 4.18
Nine Weeks - 5.03
Jazzberry Pie - 4.07
Chain Reaction - 4.16
The Promise - 4.19
Steppin' On My Shadow - 4.15
Takin' The Backroads - 4.22
In Your Presence - 4.14
Forever Yours - 4.19

In November 1997, was a busy month for Denny Jiosa. First, he went to New York to accept the SESAC award naming “Lights of the City” the NAC single of 1997. “Lights” was the biggest hit on his chart-topping CD Inner Voices. Then it was back home to Nashville to finish mixing his next release. You’re holding the results. It’s called Jazzberry Pie, and it’s quintessential Denny Jiosa. All of his now-familiar trademarks are there—the relaxed moods, the lovely way with a melody, the unexpected harmonies that never let the music cloy. Jiosa is a rarity among guitarists. He has technique to burn, but he never uses it for mere display. His mastery comes through in subtle ways: in seamless shifts of strumming style in the middle of a phrase, in brief, delicate cascades of notes that seem to grow organically out of the sonic background. No shouting here, no bombast—and not a single cliche in earshot. It’s an artistry acquired during years of performing and recording with some of the biggest names in popular music, including B.B. King, Steve Winwood, Bo Didley, Leon Russell and Glen Campbell. As a producer and studio engineer, Jiosa has been a guiding force on projects that have won 12 national awards since 1990. He’s even an accomplished actor, a veteran of many regional productions and onetime member of the touring company of Pump Boys and Dinettes. Jiosa grew up in Indiana and first picked up a guitar at the age of 11. His influences on the instrument include Wes Montgomery, Carlos Santana, Lee Rittenour and Pat Metheney. Jiosa graduated from the presitgious Musician’s Institute of Technology in Los Angeles and honed his craft during years of touring, composing, studio work and exposure to the wide variety of musical genres reflected in Jazzberry Pie—a little urban funk, a strong dollop of jazz, even some Latin and country tinges. It works. The title cut is an essay in understated swing. Jiosa pays homage to Wes Montgomery in octave passages and keyboardist Tom Reynolds adds a nifty, bluesy touch. There’s also more than a bit of funk in “Old Money,” but, as always with Jiosa, it’s subtle, never in-your-face. “Taking the Back Roads” has a relaxed, slightly country feel to it, but it’s definitely the impressions of a city boy out for a spin. The lovely “In Your Presense” is another demonstration of how to write a gorgeous ballad that never becomes syrupy—romantic, yes, but also fresh and interesting. (The tasty flugelhorn playing is courtesy of Rod Magaha .) And then there’s “Nine Weeks,” Jiosa’s love song to children—above all his daughter Alyssa. The pulse in the background is an ultrasound recording of Alyssa’s heartbeat in the womb. Jiosa made a loop of the recording and superimposed a moving composition that captures the feelings of every parent at that magical first encounter with new life. FEATURING Denny Jiosa (guitar) • Tom Reynolds (keyboards) • Chris Kent (bass) • Jim White (drums) • Eric Darken (percussion) • Hollie Farris (muted trumpet) • Alex Poston (vibes) • Rod Magaha (horn) SONGS Old Money (4:39) • 57 Pearl Street (4:07) • Vertigo (4:18) • Nine Weeks (5:03) • Jazzberry Pie (4:07) • Chain Reaction (4:16) • The Promise (4:19) • Steppin’ On My Shadow (4:15) • Takin’ The Backroads (4:22) • In Your Presence (4:14) • Forever Yours (4:19) In November 1997, was a busy month for Denny Jiosa. First, he went to New York to accept the SESAC award naming “Lights of the City” the NAC single of 1997. “Lights” was the biggest hit on his chart-topping CD Inner Voices. Then it was back home to Nashville to finish mixing his next release. You’re holding the results. It’s called Jazzberry Pie, and it’s quintessential Denny Jiosa. All of his now-familiar trademarks are there—the relaxed moods, the lovely way with a melody, the unexpected harmonies that never let the music cloy. Jiosa is a rarity among guitarists. He has technique to burn, but he never uses it for mere display. His mastery comes through in subtle ways: in seamless shifts of strumming style in the middle of a phrase, in brief, delicate cascades of notes that seem to grow organically out of the sonic background. No shouting here, no bombast—and not a single cliche in earshot. It’s an artistry acquired during years of performing and recording with some of the biggest names in popular music, including B.B. King, Steve Winwood, Bo Didley, Leon Russell and Glen Campbell. As a producer and studio engineer, Jiosa has been a guiding force on projects that have won 12 national awards since 1990. He’s even an accomplished actor, a veteran of many regional productions and onetime member of the touring company of Pump Boys and Dinettes. Jiosa grew up in Indiana and first picked up a guitar at the age of 11. His influences on the instrument include Wes Montgomery, Carlos Santana, Lee Rittenour and Pat Metheney. Jiosa graduated from the presitgious Musician’s Institute of Technology in Los Angeles and honed his craft during years of touring, composing, studio work and exposure to the wide variety of musical genres reflected in Jazzberry Pie—a little urban funk, a strong dollop of jazz, even some Latin and country tinges. It works. The title cut is an essay in understated swing. Jiosa pays homage to Wes Montgomery in octave passages and keyboardist Tom Reynolds adds a nifty, bluesy touch. There’s also more than a bit of funk in “Old Money,” but, as always with Jiosa, it’s subtle, never in-your-face. “Taking the Back Roads” has a relaxed, slightly country feel to it, but it’s definitely the impressions of a city boy out for a spin. The lovely “In Your Presense” is another demonstration of how to write a gorgeous ballad that never becomes syrupy—romantic, yes, but also fresh and interesting. (The tasty flugelhorn playing is courtesy of Rod Magaha .) And then there’s “Nine Weeks,” Jiosa’s love song to children—above all his daughter Alyssa. The pulse in the background is an ultrasound recording of Alyssa’s heartbeat in the womb. Jiosa made a loop of the recording and superimposed a moving composition that captures the feelings of every parent at that magical first encounter with new life. FEATURING Denny Jiosa (guitar) • Tom Reynolds (keyboards) • Chris Kent (bass) • Jim White (drums) • Eric Darken (percussion) • Hollie Farris (muted trumpet) • Alex Poston (vibes) • Rod Magaha (horn) SONGS Old Money (4:39) • 57 Pearl Street (4:07) • Vertigo (4:18) • Nine Weeks (5:03) • Jazzberry Pie (4:07) • Chain Reaction (4:16) • The Promise (4:19) • Steppin’ On My Shadow (4:15) • Takin’ The Backroads (4:22) • In Your Presence (4:14) • Forever Yours (4:19)


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