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UPC - 031397201824
Steve Bassett - Standing On The Verge

Release Date - Apr, 1994
$14.98

His Eye Is On The Sparrow - 0.55
Trust Me - 3.40
In The Time It Takes To Cry - 3.31
Living A Lie - 3.32
No Good For Her - 3.16
Election Day - 5.12
Everlasting Free - 4.35
Keep Pushing Me - 3.25
Standing On The Verge Of Letting Go - 2.56
Letting Go - 0.50
Sing Loud - 3.33
Money (Tired Of Working) - 3.55
Nosey Rosey - 3.23
Life Is A Carnival - 3.25
Until Then - 1.39

R&B veteran Steve Bassett brings three decades of performing experience to Standing on the Verge. He also brings a few good friends — and therein hangs a tale. “I wanted to include special people who meant something to me,” Bassett says,”but getting them all in the same studio at the same time was a logistical nightmare.” So he did the next best thing. He took the studio to them. He and co-producer Elliott Randall loaded the necessary electronics into Bassett’s Allegro motor home and hit the road, eventually logging some 4,000 miles in pursuit of their musical quarry. They recorded gospel vocalist Debbie Henry parked outside the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Washington, DC. They captured bluesman Delbert McClinton between sets in the parking lot outside Keith’s Place in Nashville. They caught bassist Darrin Lawrence in Thomas Jefferson’s yard at Monticello — playing the same instrument his father used when he backed country legend Ernest Tubb ‘way back when. They even laid down a few tracks while rolling down Interstate 81 South in the wee hours. Their musical odyssey paid unexpected dividends along the way. “Nosey Rosey,” for example, was recorded live at The North Pole just outside Richmond, VA, by running a snake between the stage and the motor home in the parking lot. And Randall, a Sha-Na-Na alumnus who went on to play with Steely Dan, the Doobie Brothers and many others, got a surprise introduction to his boyhood idol, Duane Eddy, during a stop in Nashville. The guitar lick in “Election Day” was a result of that meeting. (The mixing, incidentally, was done at Bassett’s log-cabin home in the Virginia hills.) While it may be an unusual way to make a record, travel by motor home is nothing new to Bassett. A native of Richmond, he has been on the road, it seems, since he played his first gig at the age of 13. Over the years, he has worked in rock bands, recorded TV commercials and played in countless beach bars and R&B roadhouses. Back in the late 1970s, he and Robbin Thompson penned the hit song “Sweet Virginia Breeze.” In 1980, Bassett was discovered by the legendary John Hammond, who signed him to Columbia records. The resulting album, Steve Bassett, was produced by Jerry Wexler and Barry Beckett in Muscle Shoals and led to a stint as the opening act for Stevie Ray Vaughan in a cross-country tour. These days, Bassett plays regularly with McClinton and other friends who share his love for the R&B tradition — but he is no longer imprisoned by airline schedules. “I spent about five years flying every day,” he says. “That’s enough. The motor home has all the amenities, and it gives me a flexibility I don’t have any other way. And it’s fun, like going camping between gigs. I put about 50,000 miles on it every year. I spend more time in it than I do at home.” In many ways, Standing on the Verge is a summing-up of Bassett’s long experience in the music business: part blues, part gospel, part country, part New Age — all Steve Bassett. “My roots are in Virginia,” he says. “The music of the Southeast flows most naturally from me. But I listen to everything, and all those influences find their way into my music. I’ve been fortunate with this project. For the first time in my recording career, I’ve been able to be myself.” Every song in the album has a personal meaning for Bassett, from the gospel classic “His Eye Is on the Sparrow” — “It sums up why I sing,” he says — to “Election Day,” a soulful meditation on freedom that seems to spring directly from the hill-country soil. Most of the material is original; though one notable exception is “Keep Pushing Me,” a hitherto unknown Otis Redding tune that Bassett rediscovered and brought to the attention of Redding’s widow. This is the first time it has been released commercially. Standing on the Verge offers surprising variety in barely an hour. But all the songs share three important features: the lyrics mean something, the arrangements explore familiar territory in surprising new ways, and the beat is always insistent. It all bears witness to a lively musical intelligence, open to new ideas, that never forgets where it came from. # # # R&B veteran Steve Bassett brings three decades of performing experience to Standing on the Verge. He also brings a few good friends — and therein hangs a tale. “I wanted to include special people who meant something to me,” Bassett says,”but getting them all in the same studio at the same time was a logistical nightmare.” So he did the next best thing. He took the studio to them. He and co-producer Elliott Randall loaded the necessary electronics into Bassett’s Allegro motor home and hit the road, eventually logging some 4,000 miles in pursuit of their musical quarry. They recorded gospel vocalist Debbie Henry parked outside the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Washington, DC. They captured bluesman Delbert McClinton between sets in the parking lot outside Keith’s Place in Nashville. They caught bassist Darrin Lawrence in Thomas Jefferson’s yard at Monticello — playing the same instrument his father used when he backed country legend Ernest Tubb ‘way back when. They even laid down a few tracks while rolling down Interstate 81 South in the wee hours. Their musical odyssey paid unexpected dividends along the way. “Nosey Rosey,” for example, was recorded live at The North Pole just outside Richmond, VA, by running a snake between the stage and the motor home in the parking lot. And Randall, a Sha-Na-Na alumnus who went on to play with Steely Dan, the Doobie Brothers and many others, got a surprise introduction to his boyhood idol, Duane Eddy, during a stop in Nashville. The guitar lick in “Election Day” was a result of that meeting. (The mixing, incidentally, was done at Bassett’s log-cabin home in the Virginia hills.) While it may be an unusual way to make a record, travel by motor home is nothing new to Bassett. A native of Richmond, he has been on the road, it seems, since he played his first gig at the age of 13. Over the years, he has worked in rock bands, recorded TV commercials and played in countless beach bars and R&B roadhouses. Back in the late 1970s, he and Robbin Thompson penned the hit song “Sweet Virginia Breeze.” In 1980, Bassett was discovered by the legendary John Hammond, who signed him to Columbia records. The resulting album, Steve Bassett, was produced by Jerry Wexler and Barry Beckett in Muscle Shoals and led to a stint as the opening act for Stevie Ray Vaughan in a cross-country tour. These days, Bassett plays regularly with McClinton and other friends who share his love for the R&B tradition — but he is no longer imprisoned by airline schedules. “I spent about five years flying every day,” he says. “That’s enough. The motor home has all the amenities, and it gives me a flexibility I don’t have any other way. And it’s fun, like going camping between gigs. I put about 50,000 miles on it every year. I spend more time in it than I do at home.” In many ways, Standing on the Verge is a summing-up of Bassett’s long experience in the music business: part blues, part gospel, part country, part New Age — all Steve Bassett. “My roots are in Virginia,” he says. “The music of the Southeast flows most naturally from me. But I listen to everything, and all those influences find their way into my music. I’ve been fortunate with this project. For the first time in my recording career, I’ve been able to be myself.” Every song in the album has a personal meaning for Bassett, from the gospel classic “His Eye Is on the Sparrow” — “It sums up why I sing,” he says — to “Election Day,” a soulful meditation on freedom that seems to spring directly from the hill-country soil. Most of the material is original; though one notable exception is “Keep Pushing Me,” a hitherto unknown Otis Redding tune that Bassett rediscovered and brought to the attention of Redding’s widow. This is the first time it has been released commercially. Standing on the Verge offers surprising variety in barely an hour. But all the songs share three important features: the lyrics mean something, the arrangements explore familiar territory in surprising new ways, and the beat is always insistent. It all bears witness to a lively musical intelligence, open to new ideas, that never forgets where it came from. # # #


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